”One hopes for that Zen moment when a syntax, a style unmistakably yours has shown itself.”
An interview with Lucian Ban

photo by Elmar Lemes

*Versiunea în limba română este în partea de jos de paginii. 

More than one year into the pandemic, are musicians composing more and/or differently? Beyond the constant streaming and home videos, what do you think will be left, musically speaking, from these times of crisis?

I think first and foremost what we will be left with is the trauma and the staggering loss. More than a year into the pandemic we all know somebody who passed away due to the virus and in my community we had so many musicians’ lives and livelihoods lost. Are we composing more or different now? We can look to history to learn how the world got through crises in the past but it’s my hunch that we are dealing with less also in terms of the artistic output. Not counting the deluge of home videos/streaming and the notable exceptions notwithstanding I think musicians have not created more during the pandemic. On the contrary I’m left mostly with a sense of loss and as I said it in another interview a year ago (!) streaming is not a long term answer. Jazz musicians, especially, crave interaction live on stage and with an audience. This is not to say that down the road these extraordinary times will not be reflected in the artists’ works but it’s too early still.

With production, promotion and distribution available to everyone with a computer do you see this as an explosion of creativity or a lowering of the standards? And what do you make of the “behind the scene” quest for authenticity so present nowadays?

”Something’s lost but something’s gained”  the verse says. There’s a lot of BS in the „behind the scenes “and the “authenticity theater” of today but both artists and the audience might learn something from the new ordre de jour.  Since Walter Benjamin famous 1935 book on “art and the mechanical reproduction” people have sung the death of creativity but I’m not convinced about this “losing the standards thing as I see a tremendous love for the tradition in the community and a great interest on the part of the practitioners to constantly rediscover the masters. The past might be the deepest gain of postmodernism.

The practice of jazz is defined by spontaneous collaborations and encounters – what is the difference between this and working with a stable group that affords growing and stability? What about solo playing?

I can fly (when we could do that!) to Sydney, or Buenos Aires or Tokyo, step into a jazz club and start playing with a Japanese bassist, an Australian horn player or an Argentinean drummer without any preparation, without knowing their language or they mine. This is the unique genius of jazz music and you can’t get more spontaneous than that and no other art practice can do it in such an immediate and visceral way. Lee Konitz showed us exactly that for more than 75 years all over the world till the virus unfortunately got him last year. Yet the chance to work steadily with the same group brings on some great benefits in terms of depth (just check John Coltrane great quartet or Keith Jarrett trio). As for playing solo it gets lonely on the road. A true challenge…

How does one find his or her own voice in jazz?

I think you work on it. Some get to it faster than others and some never get to it. It’s a mysterious process and there isn’t a formula really. In the past there was more of an imperative to sound like nobody else than today. You have all these geniuses in this music with such a powerful voice and sometimes it’s not easy to live in the shadow of the giants. But one hopes for that Zen moment when a syntax, a style unmistakably yours has shown itself. And then you inhabit that world.

Is playing solo similar with the work of a writer or a painter? And what you communicate is emotion exclusively?

I can’t speak for a painter or a writer but we all share the same demons don’t we? I like to think that one strives to communicate emotion but this can be very abstract as well. The blues comes in many shapes and forms…

What are the greatest solo jazz piano albums in your opinion and why these?

Well this might be a subjective list but here there are my top 10 modern jazz solo piano albums in no particular order:

  1. Thelonious Monk Piano Solo (Paris 1954)
  2. Randy Weston, African Nite (1975)
  3. Paul Bley, Open To Love (1973)
  4. Abdullah Ibrahim (Dollar Brand), African Piano (1969)
  5. Keith Jarrett, Facing You (1972)
  6. Andrew Hill, From California With Love Solo (1979, Mosaic 2007)
  7. Bheki Mseleku, Meditations (1992)
  8. Earl Hines, Plays Duke Elligton (1971)
  9. Geri Allen, Homegrown (1985)
  10. Stanley Cowell, Ancestral Streams (1973)

Answering why I consider these albums among the Top 10 would require a whole essay in itself so let me quote the great critic Nat Hentoff on just one, Paul Bley:
"... there are few pianists in any form of music who so intriguingly interweave the surprises of both beauty and the intellect”

Can jazz flourish in the university?

University is supposed to be that institution where great questions are asked free of the market’s self interest or the tyranny of politics. So the practice of jazz, like any pure form of knowledge, should surely find its home in the university but like a true folk art, jazz has always escaped the rigors of reason. Sun Ra said once said that “knowledge is the death of spirit”. Yet starting with the mid XX century, jazz has thrived in the university both as a concert venue but also as a place for research and now hundreds of jazz programs throughout the world. With all the inherent risks I’m all for it and I think universities should open themselves to the jazz practitioners in as many forms as possible to allow innovation and research to take place unfettered from commercial pressure. In doing that the university can became an essential part of the ecosystem. A program like Chamber Jazz, aside from being truly singular in Romania, embodies greatly this idea and promise of knowledge. So yeah, I’m all for it.

 


„Orice muzician de jazz visează la acel moment zen în care o sintaxă, un stil se arată și le recunoști ca fiind ale tale dincolo de orice îndoială.”
Interviu cu Lucian Ban

Cum a afectat pandemia compoziția muzicală? Se compune mai mult/diferit? Ce va rămâne – dincolo de fluviul de streaming  și homevideos – din punct de vedere muzical din această perioadă?

În primul rând, cred că vom rămâne cu trauma și cu tot ceea ce am pierdut. A trecut mai mult de un an de la începutul pandemiei și știm cu toții pe cineva care a murit din cauza virusului. În comunitatea mea, mulți muzicieni și-au pierdut viața sau nu își mai pot câștiga existența. Compunem mai mult sau altfel acum? Putem să ne uităm în urmă, la felul în care omenirea a depășit astfel de crize în trecut, dar impresia mea e că avem de-a face cu o producție artistică mai săracă. Fără a lua în calcul avalanșa de streaming  și homevideos și făcând abstracție de excepțiile notabile, nu cred că muzicienii au creat mai mult în perioada pandemiei. Din contră, simt mai curând că e o pierdere și, așa cum spuneam într-un alt interviu, în urmă cu un an (!), streaming-ul nu e o soluție pe termen lung. Muzicienii de jazz, în special, tânjesc după interacțiunea fața în față de pe scenă și după relația cu publicul. Asta nu înseamnă că, la un moment dat, aceste vremuri extraordinare nu-și vor găsi expresia în artă, dar deocamdată e prea devreme pentru asta.

Simți acest moment, în care producția, promovarea și aducerea muzicii la cunoștința publicului sunt mai accesibile ca oricând, ca pe o explozie de creativitate sau ca pe un fenomen care riscă să coboare definitiv standardele? Cum ți se pare această autenticitate de tip behind the scenes pe care o afișează muzicienii în felul în care se prezintă în fața publicului?

Întotdeauna când se pierde ceva se câștigă altceva. E și multă prostie în povestea cu în spatele cortinei și teatrul autenticității, dar există, în această nouă ordine a lucrurilor, ceva din care ar putea învăța atât artiștii, cât și publicul. Lumea vorbește despre moartea creativității încă din 1935, când a apărut celebra carte a lui Walter Benjamin, „Opera de artă în epoca reproducerii mecanice”, dar eu nu sunt convins de această coborâre a standardelor, pentru că observ, în comunitatea muzicală, un atașament extraordinar față de tradiție și un interes uriaș față de redescoperirea maeștrilor. Trecutul s-ar putea să fie cel mai mare câștig al postmodernismului.

Scena de jazz e una a colaborărilor numeroase, a dialogurilor și afinităților descoperite spontan. Cum simți tu diferența dintre asta și a cânta și într-o formulă stabilă, care permite cultivarea unor raporturi solide, bazate pe familiaritate? Dar față de a cânta solo?

Pot să  zbor (pe când era posibil) în Sydney, Buenos Aires sau Tokyo, să intru într-un club de jazz și să încep să cânt cu un basist japonez, un saxofonist australian sau un baterist argentinian fără niciun fel de pregătiri, fără să le cunosc limba sau ei pe a mea. Acesta este geniul jazzului – nu poți fi mai spontan de atât, nicio altă artă nu poate lua expresie într-un mod atât de imediat și de visceral. Este exact ce ne-a arătat Lee Konitz timp de mai bine de 75 de ani, peste tot în lume, până anul trecut, când a fost răpus, din nefericire, de virus.

Dar posibilitatea de a lucra constant cu același grup aduce niște avantaje extraordinare în ceea ce privește profunzimea (vezi cvartetul lui John Coltrane sau trioul lui Keith Jarrett). Cât despre a cânta solo, te prinde din urmă singurătatea. E o adevărată provocare.

Cum îți descoperi propria voce în jazz?

Cred că e ceva la care lucrezi. Unii ajung mai ușor la ea, pe când alții nu și-o găsesc niciodată. E un proces misterios și nu există cu adevărat o formulă. Pe vremuri, era mult mai important decât azi să nu suni ca nimeni altcineva. Dar în muzica asta avem adevărate genii, cu voci extrem de puternice, și nu e ușor să trăiești în umbra acestor uriași. Orice muzician de jazz visează la acel moment zen în care o sintaxă, un stil se arată și le recunoști ca fiind ale tale dincolo de orice îndoială. Și apoi ieilumea aceea în stăpânire.

Cum ai compara solo piano în jazz cu alte forme de expresie artistică individuală (literatura, artele plastice)? Ceea ce comunici este exclusiv conținut emoțional?

Nu știu cum e pentru un pictor sau un scriitor, dar avem cam aceiași demoni, nu? Îmi place să cred că transmit emoție, dar poate să fie și ceva foarte abstract. Acel I’ve got the blues poate îmbrăca multe forme.

Care sunt „marile albume” de solo jazz piano și prin ce au devenit ele repere?

Lista de mai jos s-ar putea să fie una subiectivă, dar iată-le, într-o ordine oarecare:

  1. Thelonious Monk Piano Solo (Paris 1954)
  2. Randy Weston, African Nite (1975)
  3. Paul Bley, Open To Love (1973)
  4. Abdullah Ibrahim (Dollar Brand), African Piano (1969)
  5. Keith Jarrett, Facing You (1972)
  6. Andrew Hill, From California With Love Solo (1979, Mosaic 2007)
  7. Bheki Mseleku, Meditations (1992)
  8. Earl Hines, Plays Duke Elligton (1971)
  9. Geri Allen, Homegrown (1985)
  10. Stanley Cowell, Ancestral Streams (1973)

Să spun de ce le consider cele mai bune ar însemna că scriu un eseu în toată regula, așa că o să citez din ceea ce a zis marele critic Nat Hentoff despre Paul Bley: „sunt doar câțiva pianiști, indiferent de genul muzical, care știu să întrețeasă atât de fascinant plăcerile surprinzătoare ale frumuseții cu cele ale intelectului”.

Poate jazzul să prospere în universitate?

Universitatea ar trebui să fie acea instituție în care marile probleme sunt dezbătute liber, la adăpost de interesele pieței și de tirania politicului. Practica jazzului, ca orice formă pură de cunoaștere, ar trebui cu siguranță să-și găsească locul în universitate, dar, fiind vorba despre o artă orală, scapă de sub rigorile analizei raționale. Sun Ra spunea odată că „cunoașterea e moartea spiritului”. Însă începând cu mijlocul secolului XX, jazzul a prosperat în universitate atât ca spațiu de concerte, cât și ca loc destinat cercetării, așa că astăzi există sute de programe de jazz în lume. Cu toate riscurile care decurg de aici, eu sunt categoric pentru și cred că universitățile ar trebui să se deschidă muzicienilor de jazz în cât mai multe moduri cu putință pentru a permite cercetării și inovației să se desfășoare fără presiuni comerciale. Universitatea poate deveni astfel o componentă esențială a ecosistemului. Un program precum Chamber Jazz, dincolo de faptul că este singurul de acest fel din România, întrupează excelent această idee și promisiunea cunoașterii. Deci da, sunt cu totul pentru.

Întrebări și traducere în limba română de Maria Ghiurțu

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *